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Student Media in the News

Z88.9 WBZC To Go Online Only

College Radio Watch: 2017 Year in Review and More News

The past few weeks have also been busy as far as press attention for Radio Survivor, with mentions in the New York Times (low power FM story) and Haverford Magazine (podcasting article). Additionally, I have two new pieces for Radio World: College Radio Station Flies Overseas for Remote Broadcasts (about my home radio station KFJC’s recent travels to Iceland and Liverpool) and Radio Preservation from the Archive to the Classroom (about the November, 2017 Radio Preservation Task Force conference).

Read more from Radio Survivor.

 

By | January 16th, 2018|Broadcasting News, CBI News, Member News|0 Comments

Board Blog: Hello 2018! And Hello CBI!

My name is Hames, Steven Hames and I am proud to be serving as CBI’s Secretary for this year … and hopefully for more (wink, wink, cough, cough).

Steven Hames, CBI Secretary

Many of you know that I have been serving CBI as the Awards Coordinator for the past five years, but there are a few things that you might not know about me. Professionally, I am the adviser for Viking Fusion and technology specialist for the Department of Communication at Berry College in northwest Georgia. A role that I have had since 2011. Before that, I served as a producer, director, and editor at several local origination television stations in north Georgia for 15 years.

I’m also a movie nerd. I’m that person who is always quoting movies and asking random movie trivia questions. I have always loved movies. When I was eight years old I saw this “little” film about a boy who befriends an alien. You may have heard of it … “E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial.” That movie impacted me so much that two years later I decided that I wanted to work in film and TV for a living. And I did it. And I enjoyed it, but as I got older I realized that I wanted to give back and help others in the industry … especially those in college, as I had some great mentors who helped me as an undergrad. I had worked with and mentored several college interns over the years, so the appeal of working full-time at a college or university really spoke to me. And now I get to do that and I’m loving every minute of it.

A big reason for loving it, is seeing my students (my “adopted” children) succeed and be recognized for their hard work. I know many of you feel the same way. In the event that you don’t know, CBI has one of the premier platforms for students to be recognized on … the National Student Production Awards. The awards give students the opportunity to compete against students from across the nation, which is something they will be doing when they enter the job market, and to be recognized on a national level, which looks good on a resume. So while the submission window is still a couple of months away, it doesn’t hurt now for your station to identify and hold onto those news reports, shows, documentaries, commercials, etc. that you want to consider entering. Makes things a lot easier when those pesky deadlines approach.

And to paraphrase Truman Burbank from “The Truman Show,” in case I don’t see ya until the Seattle convention, Good afternoon, good evening, and goodnight.

By | January 10th, 2018|About CBI, Board Blogs|0 Comments

Student Media in the News

Radio Survivor podcast recaps 2017

2017 was a year of ups and downs, from the continued growth of LPFM to the loss of net neutrality. All four Radio Survivors gather to review the year that was, assessing what happened in college radio, community radio and podcasting, with stops along the way in Istanbul, conspiracy theories and classical music. Jennifer, Matthew, Eric and Paul guarantee you won’t hear another look back at 2017 like this one.

Listen here.

SUNY Geneseo’s radio station to re-air local history series

“Geneseo Today,” airing at 10:30 a.m. will feature during the next few weeks a series of five interviews with alumni and others that were produced as part of an ongoing “WGSU History” series.

The rebroadcast is the result of January, due to holiday break, typically being a slow time of year for new student productions.

Read more from Livingston County News.

By | January 9th, 2018|Broadcasting News, Member News|0 Comments

Student Media in the News

Conservative students’ ‘Deplorable Radio’ show remains banned from university airwaves

The “Deplorable Radio” show at the University of Minnesota-Morris remains suspended indefinitely from the university’s radio station, prompting the student hosts of the show to argue they were booted because they’re conservative and politically incorrect.

The university, meanwhile, maintains the show was suspended for “multiple violations” of station policy.

Read more from The College Fix.

Radio Preservation From the Archive to the Classroom

With the 50th anniversary of the Public Broadcasting Act as a backdrop, the multi-day affair at the Library of Congress in Washington was augmented by off-site events at University of Maryland, NPR headquarters and the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars. Among the attendees were scholars, collectors, archivists, radio practitioners and fans, all united by a shared passion for radio.

Read more from Radio World.

 

By | January 2nd, 2018|Broadcasting News, CBI News, Member News|0 Comments

Student Media in the News

WVU radio station GM suspended

Matthew Fouty will not be the general manager of the West Virginia University radio station, while he is being investigated for sexual harassment allegations made by students working at the station.

Read more from The Journal.

Plus, Radio Survivor visits WIIT at Illinois Institute of Technology, and the College Radio Watch column.

By | December 19th, 2017|Broadcasting News, CBI News, Member News|Comments Off on Student Media in the News

Student Media in the News

WVU student details string of incidents that led to Thursday’s college radio strike

“It’s nothing grandiose. It’s all little things like jokes that just kind of crossed the line, comments that have been weird or asking someone out one too many times after they’ve already told you ‘no,’” said Jackson Montgomery, a WVU student and member of U92’s music department. “Stuff like that from just a whole bunch of different people that when you look at it as a big picture, you see that it’s become a pattern of abusive, harassing behavior.”

Read more from WVMetroNews.

Plus, the College Radio Watch column, and a visit to WKCR at Columbia University.

Wrap-up your holiday shopping at smile.amazon.com/ch/52-2362083 and Amazon donates to College Broadcasters Inc.

By | December 12th, 2017|Broadcasting News, CBI News, Member News|Comments Off on Student Media in the News

Student Media in the News

WPCD celebrates 40 years of operation

“A career like radio requires hands-on experience. I could talk theory in the classroom until I become blue in the face, but the students can’t get real experience without actually doing a shift or making a spot,” said Adam Porter, a professor of communication at Parkland; he also teaches the broadcast announcing courses every semester.

Read more from The Prospectus.

USU worker purchases and renovates WhySound music venue

Last week, Cardiel and a group of volunteers from Aggie Radio began renovating the venue. Volunteers scraped the red WhySound logo off the storefront windows, removed old logos, gave the walls new coats of black paint, moved the stage to the other side of the room, and even demolished a wall to increase space inside.

“I hope to make it a bigger space so people can breathe more than they used to be able to,” Cardiel said. “I’d like WhySound to be a place that people come to hang out and socialize.”

Read more from The Utah Statesman.

After decades on air, college unplugs radio station

“Unfortunately, the radio club has also experienced little student interest and has been inactive for the past two years,” the college said in a statement. “Recent events, including equipment in need of costly upgrades, the resignation of the station manager, and continued lack of interest by students are all factors which contributed to this decision.”

Read more from The Times Herald.

UPDATE: WVU responds to student radio strike in wake of “unsafe atmosphere”

Upwards of 50 students at WVU’s award-winning college radio station, U92, are on strike following allegations of an unsafe atmosphere at the station.

At 9 a.m. Thursday morning, the non-profit station and broadcast arm of WVU’s Student Media division was simply dead air. The strike was confirmed by sources involved Thursday.

Read more from WAJR.

The Remarkable History of WTJU

The station – named WTJU, for “Thomas Jefferson’s University” – was UVA’s first FM station and just the second in Charlottesville, where most cars still had only AM radios. Today, as the entire University celebrates its bicentennial, WTJU is celebrating its 60th anniversary and looking back on its beginnings in Old Cabell Hall.

Read more from UVAToday.

Why did WYCC receive millions less than expected in auction?

Mayor Rahm Emanuel was resisting a sale because CCC students were getting what he said was valuable experience at the studio, on the Englewood campus of Kennedy-King College, the editorial said. But there would be other ways to provide an updated learning experience and to stay on the air (by sharing another station’s bandwidth, for example), the Tribune argued. And CCC had only a little over a month to opt into the government auction that was providing this opportunity.

Read more from The Chicago Reader.

When do students cross the line on campus radio?

“This is an environment where people need to be professional – how they speak and what words they use and you can’t use profanities and such,” stated Juli Hinds, faculty advisory. Hinds also works as a professional radio announcer on Buffalo music station.

Read more from WBFO.

AROUSE OSU students make waves from beneath Buckeye Donuts

Headed by Grayson Kelly, president and second-year in strategic communications, and Joe Henson, vice president and a fourth-year in marketing, the Amateur Radio Organization for Undergraduate Student Entertainment is a student-run campus station.

The student radio club is organized to retain freedom of expression as a necessary function of quality entertainment and maintain a respectful meta-discourse within an increasingly polarized world, according to the AROUSE mission statement.

Read more from The Lantern.

 

 

By | December 8th, 2017|Broadcasting News, Member News|Comments Off on Student Media in the News

Student Media in the News

Radio silence no more; Loras College student reboots student-run KLCR

The school’s radio station, KLCR, has been around for decades, but participation has been declining in recent years.

For the past two years, the station was silent.

Watch the story at KCRG.com.

KSDB opens studios for open house

Vern Wirka, KSDB’s faculty adviser and journalism instructor, said the tours showed parts of radio broadcasting that usually go unseen.

“It’s not just radio anymore,” Wirka said. “I think you experience that on the tour. You see video content or streaming on multiple platforms. So we need a new term — it’s not just radio anymore, and it’s always exciting.”

Read more from The Collegian.

WQFS debuts their Lost in Space series

Inspired by NPR’s Tiny Desk concerts, Lost in Space is a new project that Hall and Fetzer dreamed up this past summer in order to promote WQFS and the work of local musicians. Hall and Fetzer decided to focus on showcasing local talent through special video performances that would be uploaded onto WQFS social media sites.

“Me and Amelia were just talking about ways we could get people engaging with the WQFS social media more, and really just ways that we could showcase the music that we were listening to and people in the area that we were excited about,” said Fetzer.

Read more from The Guilfordian.

 

Plus, the College Radio Watch column

By | December 5th, 2017|Broadcasting News, Member News|Comments Off on Student Media in the News

Student Media in the News

Lost & Found – The WHAV Call Letters

Haverford College was no stranger to radio. In 1923, Haverford was licensed to launch WABQ and built studios and a transmitting tower on campus. The station was an unqualified success, with the 1924 Haverford yearbook noting that the radio station was garnering more press than all of the athletic teams. The next year, the station went to 1,000 watts of power, making it the most powerful collegiate station in the U.S. and the second most powerful signal in Pennsylvania.

Read more from WHAV.net.

Plus, the Radio Survivor podcast makes sense of the FCC’s effort to kill net neutrality.

By | November 28th, 2017|Broadcasting News, CBI News, Member News|Comments Off on Student Media in the News